Tetherow: Mid-Century Modern Meets Central Oregon Landscape

Custom Homes

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Earlier this spring, Neil Kelly put the finishing touches on a dream project: a showcase home in Central Oregon that includes luxurious interior design, natural and reclaimed materials, energy efficiency features, and sweeping views of the Cascade Mountains.

_DSC5324The 4,200 square foot custom home, situated in the Tetherow resort in Bend, Oregon, pays homage to mid-century modern architectural style, and blends seamlessly into the surrounding high-desert landscape.

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Neil Kelly Designer Nate Ewen

“We chose a design that would suit the location: rustic, yet refined,” said designer Nate Ewen.

“The feel of the house, inside and out, sets this project apart from others. The interior is open, but the scale is not overpowering. Rooms are simple, yet sophisticated. The natural light flooding in during the day unifies and enhances each space,” Ewen said.

Design objectives for the home included capturing mountain views in front and resort views in back, while at the same time preserving privacy relative to adjacent properties. The floor plan also needed to be versatile enough to fit the lifestyle of an empty-nester couple or a family of four or five.

_DSC5382Another objective was to combine energy efficient construction and technology to create a comfortable, healthy home for the user. The house includes hybrid insulation and airtight sealing to control air flow, a ductless “mini-split” heating and cooling system, UV-resistant triple-pane windows, and a 9.24 kw photovoltaic solar energy system.

Outside, the form and features of the home grab your attention – floating canopies, subtle angles and long lines that highlight the features of the exterior yet soften its geometric shape, and the contrast of the gapped horizontal juniper siding with the vertical T&G cedar plank siding.

One striking feature of the home’s exterior presented an unusual challenge for the design team: a giant “gutter” at the low-point of the butterfly roof which defines the lower level of the home. The potential for water concentration at this point was big and the potential for water intrusion to the interior was even bigger. Ultimately, the team developed a design that directs water into a recessed 7” x 12” opening that cascades off an 11 foot high cantilevered trough. The water is then captured in a large drywell and dispersed throughout the landscaped yard.